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Why Do You Need a Business Life Coach?

Wednesday, 28th November 2012

 

Business coaching helps employees in two ways – one, when the coaching helps the leader to be a better leader so someone that is much easier to support and two when the employees are getting coached and able to work on their own stuff.

Coaching should include everything that in service of the client and will best serve the client.  A lot of times that requires much more then asking questions and validating someone.

A great life coach can definitely help a low-functioning person if that low-functioning person wants to change enough.  A good life coach will not allow the low-functioning person to make excuses.  The life coach will be determine to call the person on their excuses over and over again.  I don’t even believe there is such thing as low-functioning.  Just a person who is not motivated in certain areas of their life.  I am sure there is other areas that they are higher functioning.  If they care about something you’d be amazed at how functioning they are.  The job of the life coach would be to help explore with the person what the supposed low-functioning person really cares about and how to set up their environment to support them to move forward in the area of the life they really want.

Coaching does deal with goals, getting clear on your objects, and moving forward in your life.

Step It Up and Know Your Core Values in Business, #23

Wednesday, 28th November 2012

Today we will talk about how to step it up and know your value in business.
From my research, one of the greatest problems small businesses and entrepreneurs have is that they didn’t realize their true value and what they could bring to the marketplace early in their business. When I talk to seasoned, successful business owners, quite a few of them admit that they wished they would have fully embraced their value and the knowledge that they had to offer to the business community sooner. It would have saved them a lot of time and effort.

Here are three ways that you can own your value in the marketplace.

1-Understand what you bring to the table. Each business-person has something a little different that they offer to the world than anyone else. If you don’t know what value you have, assume you have it and start digging around for it. Coaches can also help you to start seeing what gifts you have.

2- Apply structure and success principles while at the same time being you.
Sometimes small business owners and entrepreneurs care so much about their business and want desperately for it to grow, that they think they need to copy somebody else’s path to success.
Now, learning the structure and principles of success is critical, but the other part of the formula that is not talked about as much is that once you know the structure, you get to show up and play in business using your unique style and gifts, and not other people’s.

3-Make sure your branding, marketing, and advertising communicates your unique value. What happens with many business owners and entrepreneurs is that they do a lot of work on themselves and their company, but sometimes amid all the hustle and bustle, they forget to check if their current brand, that they are advertising to the world, and their current marketing, reflect all the changes that they have made. It is not uncommon to check the text on your website and be shocked by the messages you find there.

To truly own your value in the current marketplace, it is important to understand what you bring to the table. Strive to consistently “be you” as you implement those success tools into your business. And don’t forget to update your current marketing and branding to be reflective of who you now are in the marketplace.

Until next time on Biz on Your Own Terms!

Having trouble viewing this video? Try the Quicktime Version. You may also download an MP3 of the show with audio-only by clicking here.

Building Self Confidence: Why Become An Entrepreneur? #22

Wednesday, 14th November 2012

Welcome to Biz on Your Own Terms! Today we will talk about the things you have to consider before you step into the entrepreneurial world.

There are simply too many entrepreneurs. Too many people trying to create their own jobs, be their own boss. Too many people are trying to live life on their own terms. Why are they doing this? Don’t they know that being your own boss, being able to work when you choose, and pursuing your dreams comes with a terrible cost?

Once you are an entrepreneur, this requires a huge amount of efforts, money, time and investments. So if you started your own business so that you will have more time to play or go on vacation or be with your family, then you might want to think again. Building a business at the beginning, and I don’t care what kind of business, will take work and lots of it if the business is a legal one. It could also mean time being spent away away from playing, family, and anything else that you can think of that you would rather be doing.

Furthermore, if you think you still want to be an entrepreneur because you love to deliver services, don’t fool yourself. If you think that having your business means that all you have to do is set up a website and customers will come, and that you will spend all day doing the work that you love, think again. Most find when running their business they spend most of their time doing everything except what they want to do.

Think about these things and then, decide. It is all up to you! Until next time on Biz on Your Own Terms TV!

Having trouble viewing this video? Try the Quicktime Version. You may also download an MP3 of the show with audio-only by clicking here.

Overcoming Betrayals and Challenges in Business

Wednesday, 7th November 2012

Before I joined the forces of being a person in business, I hated business. I thought it was boring, and driven by the pursuit of money, numbers, and sales. I believed it was for the technical guys and gals who could crunch numbers, make sense of the stock market, and wear uncomfortable black suits.

I was an artist. Well, at least trying to be one, and my brain was not built to understand the world of business. I happily dove into the world of writing. After three years of incredibly hard work, I landed my first book contract. I stumbled on my way until, by book three, my publishers were talking to me about the importance of promotion, marketing, and selling more if I wanted to continue publishing with them.

The realization that I would not be around as an author if I did not “step it up” and sell more was a nasty pill to swallow. But I swallowed and banged around into the world of sales, marketing, and business.

That world became tricky, and the more I learned, the more I danced in it, the more I forgot about writing. (What a sneaky environment!) The money I could make doing business far overshadowed the royalty checks off book sales.

I all but forgot the harsh world of books that caused so many struggles, and focused passionately on building my business and counted on that paying well. I’d probably still be on that path if I had not been stricken with a host of health problems that landed me in the hospital and rendered me unable to stay conscious.

As I struggled to get back on my feet, I searched for something to help heal me, something that I loved, something that calmed me. I dove back into reading literature. As I read, I rediscovered my true love. I realized that I have always loved reading a good book that transported me to another world. When I read, I feel authentically me.

I wondered why I had so neglected my love? Why was I doing so much business that my health was crumbling under the burden of stress? As I read, a message from one of the books :cleared things up: Literature never disappointed me. I thought about all the disappointments that came from the book world—the rejections, lack of sales, small payments, and frustrating plots. All the disappointments came from trying to publish—not from literature itself.


Perhaps in some ways you are like me—you had something you enjoyed doing in your life –golf, basketball, painting, woodwork, etc., and you abandoned it or did less of it because … well, lots of reasons.

When I looked at my life head on, I realized that literature did not abandon me, but I put myself into the business part of the literature out of fear. I cut off the part that I’d loved so much and did the business part until it swallowed me up. I did this even though the business gave me headaches. I valiantly plowed through, feeling like that was what needed to be done. I had become swept up in the race and did not know it because my ego was at play.

It was my ego that wanted the gold sticker that said I was successful. It was ego that listened to the publishers and pushed so hard for the sales. It was ego that took something so beautiful and made it about image, which in truth does not matter so much. My being consumed with “business” had betrayed me from keeping my real love alive.

Rethinking Core Values: The Betrayal of Business

Thursday, 1st November 2012

Before I joined the forces of being a person in business, I hated business.  I thought it was boring, and driven by the pursuit of money, numbers, and sales.  I believed it was for the technical guys and gals who could crunch numbers, make sense of the stock market, and wear uncomfortable black suits.

I was an artist.  Well, at least trying to be one, and my brain wasn’t built to understand the world of business.  I happily dove into the world of writing.  After three years of incredibly hard work, I landed my first book contract.  I stumbled on my way until, by book three, my publishers were talking to me about the importance of promotion, marketing, and selling more if I wanted to continue publishing with them.

The realization that I wouldn’t be around as an author if I didn’t “step it up” and sell more was a nasty pill to swallow.  But I swallowed and banged around into the world of sales, marketing, and business.

That world became tricky, and the more I learned, the more I danced in it, the more I forgot about writing.  (What a sneaky environment!)  The money I could make doing business far overshadowed the royalty checks off book sales.

I all but forgot the harsh world of books that caused so many struggles, and focused passionately on building my business and counted on that paying well.  I’d probably still be on that path if I hadn’t been stricken with a host of health problems that landed me in the hospital and rendered me unable to stay conscious.

As I struggled to get back on my feet, I searched for something to help heal me, something that I loved, something that calmed me.  I dove back into reading literature.  As I read, I rediscovered my true love. I realized that I’ve always loved reading a good book that transported me to another world.  When I read, I feel authentically me.

I wondered why I had so neglected my love?  Why was I doing so much business that my health was crumbling under the burden of stress?  As I read, a message from one of the books :cleared things up: Literature never disappointed me.  I thought about all the disappointments that came from the book world—the rejections, lack of sales, small payments, and frustrating plots.  All the disappointments came from trying to publish—not from literature itself.

Perhaps in some ways you are like me—you had something you enjoyed doing in your life –golf, basketball, painting, woodwork, etc., and you abandoned it or did less of it because … well, lots of reasons.

When I looked at my life head on, I realized that literature didn’t abandon me, but I put myself into the business part of the literature out of fear.  I cut off the part that I’d loved so much and did the business part until it swallowed me up.  I did this even though the business gave me headaches.  I valiantly plowed through, feeling like that was what needed to be done.  I had become swept up in the race and didn’t know it because my ego was at play.

It was my ego that wanted the gold sticker that said I was successful. It was ego that listened to the publishers and pushed so hard for the sales.  It was ego that took something so beautiful and made it about image, which in truth doesn’t matter so much.  My being consumed with “business” had betrayed me from keeping my real love alive.

Coaching Baby Boomers for Business Success

Thursday, 25th October 2012

Baby boomers are at a fun time in their lives. Most are in transition and a lot of them are looking at their businesses differently. Many of my clients ask me, in a roundabout way, if they can have it all. Can they have a full family life, successful business, and enriching “me time,” (which often includes travel or doing things that give them fulfillment)?

Clear on the Definition

The first step is to determine what having it all means to you. What it means to one person is definitely not what it means to another. Does it mean making loads of money, success exploding from your business, a very romantic love life, quality time for kids, and a spotlessly clean house? Or does it mean having that quiet satisfaction of knowing that you are happy with what is happening in your life, and you’re enjoying a sense of contributing?
A lot of my baby boomer clients want a sprinkling of things in their life that make them feel complete. If they’re overloaded in one area, things start not working out as well for them. For example, one of my friends played with a grandchild several full days a week. She loved her grandbaby and cherished the time with that child, but after doing this for over a year, she started feeling swallowed up with the labors of childcare.

It was a huge struggle for her to determine what she wanted to do because she loved her grandchild and wanted what was best for that child. But the more she took care of the child, the more she had the general sense that she was no longer contributing in a bigger way. For some women, watching their grandchild would be just perfect and completely satisfying. For this friend, that wasn’t the case.

Before she could achieve satisfaction, she had to identify what was causing the problem. Once she figured out that she had an inner yearning to contribute more and to be seen for her other skills, she was able to do something about it. It is also important to realize that having “it all” and happiness are two different things. You need to prioritize between the two.

Research the Possibilities

My friend decided the possible solution to her problem would be to find a part-time job. She then determined what kind of work she was good at and would give her the satisfaction she needed.
For other baby boomers, the answer may not be as clear cut as this example . Many of my clients need to try out the balance of the things that are most important to them. They ask themselves questions like:

  • If I work only so many hours a week, what would that be like? Feel like? How would that affect others?
  • Would more firm boundaries give me the breathing room that I need to feel better?
  • What would happen if I took a day off regularly?
  • What am I doing when I feel at my best?

After they think they know the answers to what work/life balance will bring them happiness, it is time for them to experiment and try it out and see if what they experience is anywhere close to what they imagined.
My friend didn’t need to do this because she had worked before, and she knew the kind of job she wanted and the hours and the type of work place she’d be working in. After you have a good sense of what will work for you, balancing the factors of your life, your wants, needs, and desires, it’s time to make it a reality, or in other words, time to swing into action.

Make It So

For some this can be one of the scariest steps because not only is it taking action, but it is also making a declaration for you and the kind of life that you want to live.

Striving for happiness is not always the easiest path, and is not one that can be accomplished without bravery and courage. It takes a lot to stand up against what is “normal” and say I am going to make some changes.
My friend applied for the job that met her criteria and got it within a week. Her boss is thrilled, and her husband is happier, but most importantly she is happier, and she still has a great time with her grandchild.
It is not always easy to take the steps to happiness, but that is what it takes to live a life of no regrets.

Peak Performance Training: What is “Enough” in Business?

Friday, 12th October 2012

          Living the dream is the big quest in the business world—go out rock, conquer, leverage, catapult yourself to the next level.  For what?  Well, to be in a position to conquer more.

         Is that really what business is all about?  For some yes, and for others, they are hard wired to put mile markers in their world and achieve success.  But what happens if you are not wired that way?  What happens if going out and getting on the treadmill of success, learning the systems, the strategies, the process, is killing you because it is going against your grain?

        I have, at this point, been mentored by many extremely well-established and famous people.  The truth is that some of them are caught up in the rat race as much as those they are leading.  Some of them have an almost frenetic energy and drive to accomplish more, play with more cool people in their tribe, and always make more money.

         I have witnessed people inside their tribe experience disillusionment, confusion, loss, and be so hungry, that they leave their present guru to jump aboard ship with another guru, who the person has this time  convinced themselves that he/she has the answers.

 

      As I looked at the double-edged sword of the mentor and pupil, I realized I didn’t want to play that game.  I prefer a more quiet life, not so spotlight focused, where, according to the business rules, more money means more winning.

       All that prestige, fame, and success is good for what it is—recognition that someone has something of value and others realize it; but for too many people that is not enough to achieve happiness.

So what is happiness in business built on?  Through my work with hundreds of clients and speaking to thousands more, I’ve boiled it down to two things:

  1. Knowing what level of winning is good enough for you in business and then making sure you achieve that.
  2. Contribute.  Find ways to show up in business where you feel you are contributing, utilizing your unique skills, talents and gifts, making a difference in the world that you believe in.

       Notice the two items don’t necessarily include outward success, fame and fortune,  while they don’t necessarily exclude it.

         Too many people just buy the Kool Ade and believe the mantra—you need to go bigger, higher, make more money.  I invite you to consider first perspective, and see if it really agrees with you and makes you happy.  If it does, rock on.  If something in it falls flat, really look at what does make you happy in business.  You work too much of your life to risk not being happy while you do so.  It’s up to you to discover what kind of business person you are and to incorporate that into your vision and base it on things that will bring you happiness.

Overcoming Challenges and Coaching Yourself for Business Success

Wednesday, 5th September 2012

Have you ever been afflicted with too many things going your way? When it happens it can be so surreal. For me when it happened it shook me and has become a significant turning point in my life and in my business.

Recently I have moved to California; a dream that I have secretly had for about six years. When it finally became reality, I had a hard time believing that I actually did it. So far, every day I wake up, look out the window at my palm trees and feel this small wave of delight shoot through me. Palm trees! So cool.

The longer I have lived here, the longer I get those delight shoots going through me. There’s the blessings of multiple organic grocery stores, as well as the sun shining outside almost every time I leave my house. I am less than an hour away from the beach with its gloriously splashing waves that lure me into a trance.

Then I discovered speaking groups, writer groups, and book clubs. I attended them and found that people are welcoming, intelligent and dive deeply into discussion. After attending my first book club, where we spent the night asking profound questions about a book and considering various opinions, I was invited to join the group that had been going strong for over six years. I left with a stack of books nestled under my arms that were lent to me to read, and clutched a long list of great books that I had to also read.

As I drove home, I reflected on just how awesome that experience was. I had dreamed of that kind of group my whole life. The women were incredibly kind, interesting, and the type I would love to spend more time with. I teared-up with gratitude. I felt so blessed.

When I walked into the front door of our home, I announced to my husband that I didn’t want to work anymore. “There are too many cool groups to be in and too much fun stuff to do. You’ll just have to bring in more of the money. I want to play.”

The problem with that statement was I meant it. I had been working hard for years, and I was worn down.

This tiredness of working and the lure to play and to read and write for hours, called to me almost as much as the ocean and waves called for me to come play.

I found it almost impossible to pay attention to work. I didn’t want to bring on more clients because that took away from my playtime. That was a seriously different thought for a workaholic.

I brought this issue of having too many good things in my life and that work seemed like something that I wanted to toss aside, up to my coach. She agreed that it would be tempting, then she dove in and talked to me about boundaries.

She said that the biggest thing that keeps people from making high-end six figures is not the lack of working—often people making less, work more—but the difference is how strong their boundaries are.

She challenged me to look at my boundaries around my work. I realized that if I grew stronger with my boundaries, and gave myself more time to play, and honored that, then I wouldn’t have so much resentment about having to work when it was time.

We then drilled down on how to set a very structured schedule that would get my work done, my clients seen, and my play time in.

A funny thing: as soon as I saw that my play was going to be honored, I was on fire to work again—in the allotted times of course.

Life Balancing: Meeting Self and Business Needs

Wednesday, 9th May 2012

How does one balance self-care needs with being dependable and reliable?

One of the best ways for you and everyone else to win when agreeing to do something is to strike a balance between meeting your own needs and meeting the needs of others. Think seriously before you commit to something, and only say yes to things that you are committed to accomplishing.

Core Values: When is Partnering in Business a Bad Idea?

Wednesday, 2nd May 2012

Getting someone to team up with you and help you build your business sounds like a great idea, especially when you think about all the extra work you could get done in less time. If that someone else could provide the skills in your business that you aren’t good at, even better. Of course having two minds with the same objective is better than one.


When my ex-husband was first launching his business, he partnered with a marketer and was able to make a killing. They had divided their skills, with my ex being the producer, and his partner functioning as the salesman. This partnership worked so well that they built up the company and hired over fifty employees.

But there are often more problems than not when it comes to partnering. I have coached several partnerships that took a turn for the worse. What are some of the things to watch out for?

#1: Same Skill Set Breeds Trouble

If both of you like to do the same thing, and you both want to be the service provider, it can cause a lot of trouble. One of the biggest problems is that both partners involved may have the same skill set, and both want to provide the service, and neither really wants to work on the other parts of the business that are necessary.

#2: Different Work Ethics

Nothing breeds resentment more than having one or more people in the partnership thinking that they are doing most of the work. If you have someone who dives in and gets it done, and the other person likes to have a good time, some challenges will be in store for you all.

Another thing to watch out for is if more than one person likes to be in charge, or if one of the people really likes to be in charge. There needs to be a way for all partners to feel respected and to give respect.