StepItUpQueen.com

 

Be the Best in 2013! Happy New Year!

Sunday, 30th December 2012

It is not always easy to take the steps to happiness, but that is what it takes to live a life of no regrets.

There is always a chance to make a difference.

Get prepared for next year.

How can an Entrepreneur Gain a Competitive Advantage and Effective Leadership in the Market

Wednesday, 26th December 2012
    Entrepreneurship: How do I go from being an idea/vision guy to an idea and execution guy?

The best way to go from an idea guy to execution is to implement some system where you are holding yourself accountable in getting things done. Make it so that you will do things because you don’t like the consequence if you don’t.

    Entrepreneurship: Is being a ”people person” a prerequisite for entrepreneurship?

The important thing to be successful in any field is to be determined. Steve Job was extremely successful in the tech field and he certainly wasn’t a people person at all but he was a driven person. The simple truth is we all have strengths and weakness and those aren’t excuses to not get what you want. If you can’t do something one way look for a solution or a way around it. There are always answers if you are determined enough.

    Entrepreneurship: Why do people NOT take action to start a business, even though they consciously want to?

Most often the reason don’t take the steps they want is they are too focus on the fear of the steps they are about to take. Many people are slow to start a business because they think about all the things that they will need to do, all the things they want to figure out before jumping in action then they get overwhelmed and freeze. What needs to be done is to take the first smallest step– do it. Then figure out what the next step is and take that one. The truth is you will never come up with what will actually happen and you will never find the answers either without taking the first smallest step first then the next.

Peak Performance Training for Introverted Entrepreneurs

Tuesday, 18th December 2012

Many people believe that an introvert is shy and would not fare well in the extroverted world of entrepreneurs. The truth is, introverts may keep to themselves more when they are in a situation where they are not comfortable, but that does not mean that they are shy or that they don’t talk. Introverts and extroverts are determined mainly from where they get their energy. Introverts need time with themselves and extroverts need people.

I am an introvert myself, and when I used to be asked to speak, I would get extremely sick to my stomach. Now that I have given hundreds of speeches, it is not as hard to get up in front of people, although I still feel nervous. The more you do something the easier it becomes. I used to hate networking meetings. Now people don’t believe that I am introverted. There is this thing called, “situational extroverted.” The more I do things, the more I become comfortable and the more at ease I am when I show up. The same principle will work for any introvert.
I have worked with an introvert who threw-up before giving a speech in front of five people. After diving into what she wanted to create, and why, that person exercised an incredible amount of courage, and built a whole business where she’d create events and speak with confidence and ease in front of rooms full of hundreds of people. No one would have imagined what she was like before, unless they had seen her earlier.

There are many successful entrepreneurs who are introverts. An extremely well –known, successful introvert entrepreneur that I know personally is Jack Canfield. I have talked to him about how he still is very much an introvert and how he sets up his life to honor that. He also has given hundreds of speeches to help him overcome his personal limitations because it was also part of his journey to become a great orator.

An important concept to remember if you are an introvert and you want to play in a more extroverted world of entrepreneurs, is to honor your introverted nature. If you do something extroverted, like networking or speaking, be sure to schedule downtime afterwards. Introverts need time to process and to get grounded. The key to being introverted and be in business, is to honor yourself for the way you are, and to find the courage to take the next step toward your dream.

Peak Performance Training: Step It Up and Get Results!

Wednesday, 12th December 2012

Most small business owners I coach want to earn more and work less. This is not a fairy tale wish, or a desire because they are lazy, but a real desire; an aspiration to reach their potential in both their personal and professional lives.

For the business owners to start getting those results—fewer hours and more money—they must implement principles of success to an even a higher level than they currently are.
One of the most important principles is mapping out what is possible. A great story from the winter of 2009 illustrates this point. At the time, I was busily working at my home computer, buried under mountains of projects, a small heater blew in an effort to keep me warm.

An instant message clicked on, so I hastily focused on my IM manager. I was totally unprepared to see an unexpected bump into the past as I glanced at the chatter and did a double take.
Red. It was my redheaded girlfriend from church and school. How long had it been since I’d had contact with her? It’s been almost twenty years. Wow.
We quickly began chatting, and then she got to her reason for IM-ing me. “I read your Facebook postings. How can you be so happy all the time?”
Bam. I had to roll back in my office chair. I’d never seen myself that way. But from my training to be a coach, I knew her question wasn’t about me, but about her. She must be suffering to go to the effort to look me up and establish contact.
Curious about what could be bothering her, I scheduled a phone appointment. A few days later, we talked, and I found a friendly person completely overwhelmed by her husband’s brutal dismissal from a successful business and the backstabbing he suffered.
The ugliness of the situation weighed on her, causing her to have a bleak outlook for her family’s future. It was clear her husband’s lay-off weighed her down, preventing her from remembering what was possible.
“What do you want?” I asked.
After some reflection, she said, “I want him to have a job where he is valued.”
“Is that possible?” I asked.
“I don’t know. With the economy being what it is, and so many people losing their jobs—”
I interrupted her. “I think it is possible your husband can not only get another job quickly, but a higher paying one where he is valued.”
“You do?”
“Don’t you? You just told me how he was the key person in the last business, right?”
“Oh, yes. He made them so much money. They still need him. They keep calling, asking questions on how to do things.”
“So why can’t he get a better job?”
“We live in a small town.”
“So?”
“I guess he could get a better job. No, you’re right. He can.”
Using an effective coaching question, I asked, “What’s next?”
“For me to believe in the power of the possible.”
Don’t you just love that phrase—the power of the possible?
If you believed in the power of the possible, what would you believe in? What would you dare consider that could happen? With my redheaded friend, I wasn’t sure what would happen, but I did know she would be happier if she held onto the power of the possible.
Two weeks later, I heard from her again.
“I wanted to thank you,” she started off, and then got to the juicy part. “My husband got a job last week. You won’t believe this—he loves his job. They treat him well, and the best part is that he’s making more than he did in his last job.”
As soon as she shifted to how she was showing up in her own life, her whole family’s circumstances changed. What amazed me was the impact a spouse’s belief can have All she had to do was plug back in to her natural optimistic self. That was enough to energize the whole situation. Her belief in her husband was enough for him to do what he needed to in order to get to his next professional level.

Stop right now and write down what situation in your life currently needs some energizing. Look at it and ask, “What’s possible?” Now believe in the power of the possible and get the results you want out of your life and your business.

Stop Sabotaging Yourself in Your Career

Tuesday, 4th December 2012

When was the last time you felt completely drained, like you did not belong in your job? Ever ask what you were doing at the job in the first place? What if I told you it was possible to do the work you choose, and you don’t have to have that awful, overwhelming feeling again?

One of my clients in 2009 was a cute Asian girl with short, trendy hair, a black business suit, and large, sad, brown eyes. As we began to work together, I discovered a beautiful, radiant artist’s soul. She arrived in Utah from a cosmopolitan area with a history of miserable jobs in sales and a passion for the big city. Not long after moving to the middle of the Rockies, she wondered why she suffered from so many headaches, bouts of the flu and colds, and felt absolutely drained most of the time.


She quickly discovered that the job she found in Utah was not giving her enough money to meet her bills. She’d found work in what she thought was perfect for her—a young, progressive company with lots of opportunities. But it did not take long before she felt completely disconnected. The stress of being miserable at the job began to affect her health. On came the headaches and the flu. She called in sick more and more. Since her jobs were based on performance, her ability to financially put her student husband through school was seriously compromised. Eventually, after months of this high stress, her long-suffering and patient husband gave a “we can’t continue like this” talk.

Desperate, and knowing she had her living, health, and marriage on the line, she tearfully asked me what the problem was. Why was she so miserable with a job she thought she would be good at? How could she get herself into a better place? I immediately prescribed a value assessment to determine her top three to five values.

Upon taking the test, it became clear that what she was missing was not honoring one or more of her values in each of her duties. After looking at her list of values, she said, “Now I understand why I’m so miserable.” She started asking herself questions like: “If I value aesthetics so much, why am I not pursuing a career that includes them?” and, “How can I bring more of my values into my current job until I am at the right spot to change jobs?”
Over the next couple of weeks, she thought about her top values and whether her work honored them. She came to a deep understanding what that really meant to her. As a result, major shifts followed in her job, housing situation, and health.

Those few critical questions set her on a completely different path. Since then she has chosen the industry she wants to be in, has gotten training to prepare her for that path, and has made huge shifts in what she looks for in jobs that help her get by until she qualifies for the one she wants to land eventually. She’s not sick as often, and her husband has time to focus on his studies. Best of all, when she thinks about her career, she is on fire with the passion that makes her ready to take on the future.

What are your top three values? Are you honoring them in every area of your life? If not, Step It Up and Be on Fire completely, by living within your values.